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Lively Anna Karenina Reading at BookPeople

BookPeople reading sign 11jan15Thank you to everyone who turned out for my reading of Anna Karenina on Sunday, January 11--all fifty or so of you!  It was especially lovely to see so many translator friends in the audience.

BookPeople did a first-rate job of promoting the event and even featured me on their events sign (left).

They had me sign extra copies, so if you couldn't come but want a signed book, drop by the store before they run out!

The "Real" Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina gets around. She's had a second career touring the world, dropping in on television studios and movie sets, portrayed by Greta Garbo, Sophie Marceau, Vivien Leigh, and Jacqueline Bisset, among others. Russian comic book artists even reinvented her in a graphic novel set in the New Russia, complete with "cell phones and cocaine, sushi bars and convertibles." And the latest screen version, with Keira Knightley as Anna, put us squarely in the realm of fan fiction, presenting the story reimagined as a theatrical production.

And, of course, the novel has been translated into English many times.

But what if none of those translations fully appreciated, let alone conveyed, the true glory of Tolstoy's characters and story lines and the perfect way they mesh because they failed to notice that Tolstoy made some of his most important points not explicitly but in the way he used language? That he did at least as much showing as telling?

What if Tolstoy was an innovative stylist as well as a masterful psychologist and storyteller?

What if indeed?

Read the rest of my HuffPost post about my new translation of Anna Karenina (Yale University Press)  here.

"What Makes a Good Literary Translator"

It is not often that I read something about literary translation that strikes such a chord with me as this interview with Daniel Hahn, director of the British Centre for Literary Translation, and Urdu language translator Fahmida Riaz, during a literary translation workshop taking place in Karachi on 13-17 October. 

In particular, this Q&A:

What linguistic qualities are the hardest to translate?

Oh, all of it. Translation is impossible! And I don't just mean it's really, really difficult, but really, it's not actually possible. There's not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it's always interpretative, approximate, creative. Anything that is, itself, a 'linguistic' quality will by definition be anchored in a particular language — whether it's idiom, ambiguity, or assonance. All languages are different. There are congruences between languages that are more closely related, of course, but those relationships are very much in the minority.

The truth is out. 

Ethan Alexander Perets Reviews "Walpurgis Night"

Walpurgis Night coverFor a most thorough and intelligent review of this classic Russian play, read Ethan Alexander Perets's piece on Words Without Borders.   

Walpurgis Night is a burning drink of a play made from equal parts violence and comic relief. Its success almost singularly depends on the skill with which these parts are mixed. Not only must the proportions be accurate, but also the timing of their combination. Likewise, Erofeev focuses not just on what is said, but how dialogue is delivered. In these regards Schwartz's translation is impeccable. Her attention to the brutality of Erofeev's language, his comedic timing, and the sounds of words as they are spoken will likely make the work a classic outside of Russia.

I'm grateful not only for the compliment but also for Perets's analysis of the play and the play in the context of Russian literature, culture, and history.  Hat's off to him for writing a review the way a review should be written.