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Marian Schwartz

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Marian Schwartz has translated over sixty volumes of Russian classic and contemporary fiction, history, biography, criticism, and fine art. She is the principal English translator of the works of Nina Berberova and translated the New York Times’ bestseller The Last Tsar, by Edvard Radzinsky, as well as classics by Mikhail Bulgakov, Ivan Goncharov, Yuri Olesha, and Mikhail Lermontov. Her most recent publications are Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Andrei Gelasimov's Rachel, Daria Wilke's Playing a Part, and half the stories in Mikhail Shishkin's Calligraphy Lesson: The Collected Stories. She is a past president of the American Literary Translators Association and the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts translation fellowships, as well as the 2014 Read Russia Prize for Contemporary Russian Literature.

 

 

"The Tattered Cloak": "The 10 Best Short Story Collections You've Never Read"

tatteredcloak coverIndeed, Nina Berberova's The Tattered Cloak is as fine a collection of short stories as you're likely to find from the twentieth century.

Mia Alvar writes at Publishers Weekly:

"The Russian expats who inhabit these stories aren't given a lot of time to nurse their wounds between the revolution back home and the impending world war in their adopted city of Paris. And Berberova's graceful but merciless portraits—of fading countesses, dreary bohemians, former elites now busing tables and cleaning floors, all clinging if only barely to their memories (or fantasies) of a fancier life—had me aching right along with them. One heroine, Sasha, wakes up from a dream with "a strange aftertaste, a mysterious knot that weighs on me to this very day"—words I could easily steal here to describe the spell Berberova casts with each story in this collection."

First published by Knopf, it's currently in available in paperback from New Directions.

"Anna Karenina" Longlisted for National Translation Award

Anna Karenina coverA very nice surprise. My Anna has been longlisted for the National Translation Award given by the American Literary Translators Association! The  list is not just full of distinguished translators but a good guide to anyone looking for something new to read in international literature. Bear in mind, also, that the NTA is the only major translation prize in the US that does a thorough examination of the translation against the original, an incredibly labor-intensive process that only adds to the prize's luster and makes it all the more meaningful to get even this far.

The winning translators will receive a $5,000 cash prize, and the award will be announced at ALTA's annual conference, which will be held this year at the Marriott University Park in Tucson AZ from Oct. 28-31, 2015.

The five-title shortlists will be announced in September. In the meantime, ALTA will highlight each book on the longlist with features written by the judges, on the ALTA blog.

Great Russian literature 'probes the ultimate questions of human life'


Gary Saul Morson, a professor of Slavic literature at Northwestern University, wrote the brilliant introduction to my translation of Anna Karenina  and was the featured speaker at the Read Russia awards ceremony this year, where he explained: "Because Everyone Needs a Little Russian Literature." Morson, one of the foremost authorities on Russian literature in the United States, was interviewed by Russia Beyond the Headlines about his love for Tolstoy, the ongoing popularity of the Russian classics and what, if anything, politicans can gain from studying literature.

Film Version of "Thirst" Now on Youtube

thirstYou can now see the film version of Andrei Gelasimov's novel Thirst on Youtube--complete with English subtitles. Then you'll definitely want to read the book--a great favorite of mine.

In the story, 20-year-old Chechen War veteran Kostya, maimed beyond recognition by a tank explosion, spends weeks on end locked inside his apartment, his sole companions the vodka bottles spilling from the refrigerator. But soon Kostya's comfortable if dysfunctional cocoon is torn open when he receives a visit from his army buddies who are mobilized to locate a missing comrade.

The terrific screenplay is also the work of the book's author, the extremely talented Andrei Gelasimov.