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  • Gelasimov_Rachel_Cover
  • PlayingAPart_cover
  • Walpurgis Night cover
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Marian Schwartz

20140122 marian 0108 web

Marian Schwartz has translated over sixty volumes of Russian classic and contemporary fiction, history, biography, criticism, and fine art. She is the principal English translator of the works of Nina Berberova and translated the New York Times’ bestseller The Last Tsar, by Edvard Radzinsky, as well as classics by Mikhail Bulgakov, Ivan Goncharov, Yuri Olesha, and Mikhail Lermontov. Her most recent publications are Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Andrei Gelasimov's Rachel, Daria Wilke's Playing a Part, and half the stories in Mikhail Shishkin's Calligraphy Lesson: The Collected Stories. She is a past president of the American Literary Translators Association and the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts translation fellowships, as well as the 2014 Read Russia Prize for Contemporary Russian Literature.

 

 

The (Unbearable?) Lightness of Translation

Anna Genova has published an interview with me--in Russian--at Russkii mirdiscussing in particular my long association with the great twentieth-century writer Nina Berberova, my translation of Anna Kareninaand my principal focus on contemporary writers. I was very happy to have an opportunity to bring up the subject of the swift transformation of the Russian language in the decades since the fall of the Soviet Union, a phenomenon of endless fascination--and frustration--for me.

Hats off to Russell Valentino, who noticed the Kundera reference in the article's title.

Post Says It's Time To Read Mikhail Shishkin's Maidenhair

maidenhairAccording to Chad Post, writing in Publishers Weekly,  Maidenhair is one of the twenty best books you've never read:

One of the best books I've read in the past decade, Maidenhair is the sort of densely beautiful book where, after reading 50 pages, you may not know what's going on—there are three distinct storylines, all of which bounce off one another, without completely connecting until the very end—but you'll know that what you're reading is an absolute masterpiece of world literature.

Time to fix that!

Full disclosure: Maidenhair was published by Chad Post's fine publishing house, Open Letter Books.

Soeurette Diehl Frasier Translation Prize from the Texas Institute of Letters

Anna Karenina coverAt their annual banquet last night, the Texas Institute of Letters gave me the Soeurette Diehl Frasier Award for Best Translation for my translation of Anna Karenina. It's a great honor to be recognized by writers this smart, inquisitive, and accomplished. 

Texas, with its large and increasing numbers of readers, writers, and translators from all over the world, is fertile ground for new attention to be brought to international literature. Judging from last night's comments, I can say with certainty that some serious conversations lie ahead.

My thanks once again, to the Institute for Literary Translation in Moscow, a nonprofit organization whose primary goal is the promotion of Russian literature around the world, Without their grant, this book would not have been possible.